A reader writes:

Maybe you mock Malkin et al. a bit too much. Seems to me that for much of last year's campaign, those on the right mocked and pooh-poohed Obama's internet strategy and the liberal netroots. Now they've discovered that there's something behind bottom-up organizing and social networking driven by the web. I think that's all to the good, don't you? I'm willing to give them time to find a message worthy of their newfound cybertoys and accept that there's nothing at all surprising about the incoherence and irrationality of their tea parties.

Let them try to gather the masses. Let them find out how easy it is to have things go viral and how hard it is to sustain something without a cogent message or an articulate messenger. The sooner they discover all of this, the sooner we might actually have a Republican party that can take a serious role once again in the governance of this nation.

My frustration is not with the manner of the protest, but simply the difficulty of discovering what it is exactly they are against and, more importantly, what they are for.

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