A reader writes:

I watched Susan Boyle over and over today. I'm so moved by it... her voice is simply beautiful, of course, but she owned that stage. She knew she belonged there - where the hell did that assurance come from?

I looked up her story: she was bullied terribly as a child, had or has a disability, has never been married, never been kissed, probably never been somebody’s most important person. After all that, and having just come out of serious depression on her mother’s death, what on earth gives her the confidence to get up there on the stage? Where did she find that courage?

And the self-belief that she can rock that audience... and the world it seems? I work with women in prison. I so wish we could bottle whatever it is that has made Susan believe she deserves – and can create - a different reality for herself; even one that is so seemingly out of reach and impossible. I am in awe of her capacity to do that. And I wish the world would be converted to the courage of the women I work with as much as they seem to be to Susan...

 Peace to you in this easter season. And may the impossible continue to unfold.

The emails continue to flood in. She touched something in all of us. While you're at it, Stavros Flatley is pretty marvelous as well.

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