Morgan Clendaniel looks toward the horizon:

What’s next for gay marriage? New Hampshire, which allows civil unions, has a gay marriage bill before its state senate that has already passed through the House, which could potentially keep up this impressive momentum.  You have to imagine that Maine and Rhode Island, the two other New England states that don’t allow gay marriage, are going to be serious targets. Gay marriage bills are also up for votes soon in New York, New Jersey, Illinois, and Washington, though none looks that hopeful.

But what matters is the legislative, not judicial route. and then what matters is the question of why the federal government will recognize 99 percent of marriages in Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Iowa, but not one percent. On what grounds can the feds usurp the rights of states to determine what civil marriage is? What we need is a clear federal recognition of all marriages duly recognized in the various states. What we need is the repeal of DOMA.

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