A reader writes:

You printed a “View from my Recession” a while back, where I talked about having to escort employees out of the office who’d been laid off. Just wanted to give a follow-up, and a reminder of the real personal cost and impact of the recession on real people’s lives.

We just learned today that one of those employees who’d been let go, one who had been with the company some sixteen years, had spiraled down into cycle of depression and alcoholism to the point he collapsed and had to call 911. He was committed into a treatment facility, where he stayed a week, but then instead of moving to a half-way house as recommended, checked himself out of the hospital, went home and shot himself.

These things are never simple, but it’s hard to forget that you were the one that let him go and then sort of hoped for the best. You always assume people will land back on their feet one way or another – but sometimes they don’t.

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