In opposing condom use to prevent HIV and AIDS transmission, Benedict XVI is not far off official US policy under the Bush administration's PEPFAR program. Jamie Kirchick has an excellent summary in TNR:

Under Dybul's directorship, PEPFAR supported a series of African figures (such as Ugandan Pastor Martin Ssempa) who oppose the use of condoms and support discriminatory, and at times violent, policies against gays. Ssempa, for instance, whose church has received PEPFAR money, recently declared that "homosexuals should absolutely not be included in Uganda's HIV/AIDS framework. It is a crime, and when you are trying to stamp out a crime you don't include it in your programs."

The Bush administration's policies against HIV in Africa were adamant in barely acknowledging any gay men, or reaching out to sex workers, or dealing with IV drug use, or promoting condom use. In America, of course, it is hard to address the HIV epidemic if you cannot say the word "gay" and if your political agenda requires alliances with black churches who have done so much to entrench homophobia, denial and thereby HIV-transmission among African-American men over the years.

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