James Kwak blames Greenspan for the financial crisis:

Obviously a crisis of the current magnitude requires the participation of many people and institutions. But if you are looking to place blame, you need to focus on people who could have made a difference. Blaming things on "greed" or "greedy people" is silly, because as someone once said, greed is like gravity: you know it exists, and you have to expect to be there. Blaming individual rating agencies, mortgage lenders, investment banks, bank CEOs, etc. also doesn't work. In each case, if that agency/lender/bank/CEO had behaved differently, it would have made no difference. In a competitive market, it would have simply lost market share and been replaced by a less scrupulous competitor (or, in the case of a CEO, he would have been fired).

Greenspan is different, and uniquely important, for a couple of reasons.

Yes, but at least Greenspan has admitted his mistake.

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