E.D. Kain responds to my post on Israel:

Andrew called the war in Gaza the “last straw” and I agree, and I think many other mild supporters of Israel looked at that war with new found skepticism or outright disgust and dismay, if only because the entire debacle simply felt so pointless.  Americans may gravitate toward war - we’ve developed a grand mythos to justify our own past actions - but we despise pointless war.  We’ve developed a story for these senseless wars, too, which counterbalances against the “noble war” tradition, and in a sense further gild that tradition; which is why Vietnam is seen as the polar opposite to WWII, and can be held up as a contrast to other “good” wars.  This is also why the war of 1967 resonates with Americans.  It was a war that pitted Israel against almost overwhelming odds - it was a fight for the young nation’s very survival.  It was a good war.

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