A reader writes:

Archbishop Fisichella's overdue statement notwithstanding, this whole episode is very disturbing. We do not know the full character and motivation of the adults in this 9 year old's life as it pertains to this episode - the stepfather, the mother and the doctor who performed the abortion. However, it is clear that the 2 adults who were excommunicated were arguably the least deserving of such treatment.  Perhaps mom had the abortion done for selfish reasons ("what would the neighbors think"), and perhaps the doctor just wanted a fee or gets kicks out of performing abortions.  But at least it could be argued that mom and the doctor were acting to save the life of a 9 year old, that they were acting out of love and human decency.  As to the stepfather, however, there is no way one could ever hypothesize that he was acting for the benefit of another human being.  As to these 3 adults, the only one not excommunicated was the one who can make no claim of human kindness in his actions.  What does that tell us about the Catholic church?

And if that is not enough, now this 9 year old gets to carry the burden of being the person "responsible" for her mom and a doctor being excommunicated by the Church.  Much could be said about the bankruptcy of a Church that cares only about the unborn, unseen, fetus (whom they don't have to take care of, except to excommunicate those who for any reason abort such fetus), and that cares not at all for a 9 year old girl, outside of her capacity for procreation.  The Bible tells us that "he who says he loves God (whom he doesn't see) but hates his neighbor (whom he does see) is a liar."  About 20 years ago, the Church turned its attention to the abortion issue to the exclusion of all others, including the necessary counseling of its own wayward priests who were molesting children and who needed to be guided away from ministry to children (for the priests' sake as well as the children's sake).  Why the obsession with abortion?  It has revealed a Church that has exiled even the slightest human compassion from its midst, as the soap opera from Brazil has shown.

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