Thomas Hegghammer reviews L'Apocalypse dans l'Islam:

The jihadists begin to appear particularly down-to-earth when set alongside another class of Islamic extremists that have been all but ignored in the West: Islamic apocalypticists. These are people who believe an end-of-the-world battle between the forces of good and evil is forthcoming. Belief in the imminence of the end of time has been on the rise in the Muslim world since the late 1970s, and in a fascinating new book, Jean-Pierre Filiu investigates the origins of Islamic apocalyptic thought and its disturbing modern manifestations. Filiu examines both the Shiite and Sunni traditions from the seventh to the 21st century, and shows that the past two decades have seen a spectacular rise in the scope and popularity of apocalyptic literature.

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