By Patrick Appel
Only two senators voted against Clinton's confirmation. David Vitter (R-La.) was one of them. Chris Cillizza explains why Vitter voted the way he did:

The freshman Senator is preparing to run for re-election in 2010 despite revelations last year that his name turned up in the records of the "D.C. Madam". Given those problems and talk of a primary challenge from his ideological right, Vitter's vote against Clinton is a clear signal to conservatives in the state: "I am still one of you."

Will it work? Maybe. Vitter has made LOTS of enemies during his rapid rise from the state House to the U.S. Senate, and politicians have a keen sense for when blood is in the water. The vote against Clinton isn't likely to dissuade these ambitious pols from considering a run against Vitter.

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