A reader writes:

I have never been overly political, and I am purposely registered as ‘unaffiliated’ in California, as I’ve never felt that a two-party system was inherently democratic.  I’ve also never been an alarmist nor have I been a rabid politico.  Several events, both public and private in nature, have led me to the point where I simply cannot look away from what’s happening right now.

I am a student of journalism, political science and law, holding degrees/backgrounds in all three. What we’re seeing now is nothing short of terrifying if people take a step back and do some basic analysis on a macro level. 

What this horrible McCain/Palin campaign is doing is reminiscent of the worst of the 1930’s. Whipping uneducated, mindless acolytes into a violent – perhaps literally – frenzy, stirring fear and playing our citizens against themselves and each other. We’ve seen ‘journalism’ in Sean Hannity broadcast a disgusting and totally false propaganda hit piece in furtherance of this movement. We’ve even recently seen a quasi-nationalization of our main business – credit – much like what happened 70+ years ago.

I’ve never been an alarmist nor someone to lean towards the melodramatic, but am I wrong in feeling as though our governmental system and very freedom could be at stake in the coming weeks? This terrifies me, and has prompted me to act.

I have faith in the American people. They'll see through this to what we need, and make the best choice available. They made the right choice in the 1930s, unlike many other nations. They will make the right choice again. If I didn't have that faith, I wouldn't have the hope I feel.

The only response to this fear-mongering is hope-mongering, a pride in America's resilience, a confidence in her inventiveness, and a determination to get to the ballot box. This is not an election you can sit out. This is an election where we all have to take a stand, including the press. Too much is in peril for a false neutrality.

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