Singles

Yglesias points me to some new manipulatable maps on gender disparity among singles. Among the young, there are more single men. Ezra Klein explains why:

On the young end of the spectrum, single men outnumber single women just about everywhere. If you hold the ages to 20-34, DC, for instance, has 27 extra single men for every 1,000 people. Shift the slider so it tracks folks from age 45 to 60, and DC has 48 more single women for every 1,000 folks. The reason for this, basically, is that women marry younger. About 1/3rd of women are married by age 24. Only 1/5th of men are. That creates some imbalance.

These maps still don't account for gays. The map-maker blames the government:

Sure, there are some issues with the map. The first: homosexuality! This data and this map are completely heteronormative, but please direct invective at our pal the Census Bureau. Also, I don't think I can really trust the internet on this one, but men are about twice as likely to identify as gay than women - what's this mean for the map? It'll skew hard towards there being a ton of unmarried men! Those lonely young single guys might actually be in perfectly marriageable relationships, but prevented from tying a federal-government-approved knot.

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