Thanks to Stephen Hayes:

There are legitimate questions about how Palin was vetted. But many news organizations are using the vetting issue as an excuse to make insinuations about Palin's family and her role as a mother. Instead of asking whether McCain knew that Palin wanted "an exit plan" from Iraq in December of 2006, for example, reporters are obsessing about Bristol Palin's fiancé and whether Sarah Palin can serve as vice president and be a good mother.

My italics. I'm not sure if this is the first time a neoconservative has raised the question of Palin's views on Iraq. Even if it's part of an argument that the press should stop checking on the obvious, glaring weirdnesses staring us all in the face here, it's still a move toward sanity on the right. The people who should be most incensed by the Palin pick are foreign policy neoconservatives. The selection has made a mockery of their entire case for McCain. So why aren't they publicly mad? I mean: they're not partisans, right? They're intellectuals.

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