Andrew Romano, along with Marc and Ben Smith, wants to know about Palin's press strategy:

If Team McCain does shield Palin from the spotlight for the remainder of the month, voters could react one of three ways.

If they 1) don't notice or 2) say "good for you, Barracuda"--a likely response, given the way most members of the human race feel about the MSM--McCain wins. It's all about message control and reducing the risk of gaffes. If, however, a critical mass of swing voters starts to suspect that Palin can't handle the heat, it could reinforce the idea that her selection was a cynical political ploy and undercut McCain's "straight talk" appeal.

Either way, it's worth noting that in times like these, the political press corps--as despised as it might be--is actually important. As I wrote earlier today, Palin's relatively skimpy C.V. means that the greatest test of her readiness for office--as it was for Obama--will be how well she performs in the presidential pressure-cooker.

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