The Palin pick does break the mold:

"I think she is the most inexperienced person on a major-party ticket in modern history," said presidential historian Matthew Dallek. That includes Spiro T. Agnew, Richard Nixon's first vice president, who was governor of a medium-sized state, Maryland, for two years, and before that, executive of suburban Baltimore County, the expansive jurisdiction that borders and exceeds in population the city of Baltimore.

It also includes George H.W. Bush's vice president, Indiana Sen. Dan Quayle, who had served in the House and Senate for 12 years before taking office. And it also includes New York Rep. Geraldine Ferraro, who served three terms in the House before Walter Mondale chose her in 1984 as the first female candidate on a major-party ticket.

Again, I think experience, while important, is not the really salient issue here. The lack of any record of even interest in foreign policy is the issue. I've still not been able to find a single statement of hers on foreign policy apart from that Alaska Business Monthly embarrassment, when she said she'd heard of the surge "on the news." Anyone else found anything yet?

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