We have gotten used to Bush's decision-making style. Minimal input, instant decision, refusal to ever think again, and disdain for any process of thinking things through or ever having second thoughts. Just gut - and instant leaps. This description of how she made the absurd decision to run for vice-president is particularly chilling:

GIBSON: And you didn't say to yourself, "Am I experienced enough? Am I ready? Do I know enough about international affairs? Do I -- will I feel comfortable enough on the national stage to do this?"

PALIN:  I didn't hesitate, no.

GIBSON:   Didn't that take some hubris?

PALIN: I -- I answered him yes because I have the confidence in that readiness and knowing that you can't blink, you have to be wired in a way of being so committed to the mission, the mission that we're on, reform of this country and victory in the war, you can't blink.

So I didn't blink then even when asked to run as his running mate.

Never blink, never think, just go with your gut. Pure ambition. Minimal thought.

If you loved the last eight years, you'll love President Palin. I wonder: did they ever ask her the last, routine, basic vetting question:

 

Is there anything more you need to tell us that might potentially damage or embarrass the campaign?

Did they even ask her? If they did, did she say no? I have a feeling this question will be critical in the coming weeks as this hologram of neocon fantasy comes into sharper relief.

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