From you, not the bloggers:

After reluctantly watching the Couric interview of Palin, I felt more strongly than ever -- viscerally -- that she and McCain must be stopped for the good of the nation and the globe. And it occurred to me that, should they lose, we will eventually hear the inside story from the campaign:  that from the moment McCain impulsively picked her, every single move the campaign made, every hail Mary, the war on the press, the suspension of the campaign, etc., was focused first on containing the damage they knew would be caused by letting Palin open her mouth without a teleprompter.

She must be pressured to release her medical records NOW.

Remember she's capable of endlessly repeating indisputable untruths. Of course we need her medical records. Her word is meaningless. Another reader:

If I had been the person interviewing Gov. Palin, and had asked for specific examples of McCain's leadership on a topic that he brags about, and had been told, in essence, "I cant, think of any, but I'll get back to yah," I'd have laughed, and said that you've got to be kidding me!

Another:

In all honesty, I feel bad for Sarah Palin. Clearly from her answers you can see she's been thrown into the deep end of the pool, trying to recall the various answers they told her to give to questions. Most of my very partisan friends think she's dumb, I'm not sure. I imagine most governors out there picked out of obscurity and told they have to learn the intricacies of American foreign policy would  sound much like this. She should have said no.

Another:

Well, the words were all in English, and in groups of two or three they fit together, but that's the best I can say about it.  I especially "liked" this part:

"reducing taxes ... has got to accompany tax reductions, and tax relief for Americans"

Those aren't talking points; they're babbling points.

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