Marc Lynch notes a few signs that they are stepping up support:

In conjunction with Nuri al-Maliki's trip to Abu Dhabi, the UAE announced that it had appointed an ambassador to Baghdad and would forgive Iraqi debt ($7 billion according to the Arab media, $4 billion according to English reports - not sure why the discrepancy).  Jordan appointed an ambassador, and the King reportedly plans to be the first Arab head of state to visit Baghdad.   Iraq is now reportedly beginning talks with Kuwait over outstanding issues, including debt, oil fields, compensation claims, and the border. This is capped with an editorial by al-Sharq al-Awsat's editor calling on Maliki to respond to the Arab opening with real national reconciliation, and a guest editorial in the same paper by Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh.

Maybe Maliki's threat of setting a timetable for US withdrawal was a suck-up to his neighbors. But it's still a good sign: we want Iraq's neighbors to be part of stabilizing the place. And as the age of Obama seems to approach, the ground is shifting.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.