Abe Greenwald's advice for McCain be more of a neocon than Bush:

A frontal attack on Bush's multilateral accommodation with Kim Jong Il would constitute a principled stand on national security, nuclear non-proliferation, and human rights. Moreover, by simply demonstrating that North Korea has given no indication of its readiness to declare, disable, and dismantle its nuclear programs in compliance with UN Security Council resolutions, McCain would be taking a hard-nosed national security position requiring none of the military talk that tends to turn away Democrats and independents. Finally, it is a position that follows naturally from John McCain's previous statements on the matter.

Wait, there's more:

Challenging the administration's North Korea capitulation would allow the senator to demonstrate that he is not George W. Bush 2.0, no flip-flop required. It might also attract the admiration of the vast Bush-hating portion of the electorate who (rightly or wrongly) feel that the President's foreign policy high-mindedness is merely posturing to cover self-interest. McCain, the much-vaunted "maverick," needs to start living up to that description.

Oookaaay.

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