A reader writes:

Last year I was in Lima, Peru. I took an 1 1/2 hour flight north to the city of Chiclayo. From there I drove for 10 hours, 4 of which were on dirt roads, to the town of Chachapoyas in the Andes. I had made this effort to explore some archaeological sites in the region.

One evening after dinner I wandered the town square and came upon an internet cafe which was teeming with local teenagers. There was a line of kids waiting to take any computer as soon as it became available. I walked around the cafe. These kids were gaming, chatting, researching homework, and yes, looking at pictures of scantily clad women.

It boggles the mind to think that a man who could be president of the United States is less comfortable on the internet then rural Peruvian teenagers who are a 10 hour drive from the closest thing that could be called a city.

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