By Patrick Appel
Amy Wilentz, a former mentor of mine, has a profile of Carter in the latest issue of New York:

What’s most interesting about [Jimmy] Carter at the age of 83 is not that he’s an eccentric, or that he’s outspoken, or that he continues to be a part of the debate, but that his mind-set and his policies seem to jibe so well with the attitudes of young people, students, and the blogosphere. In many ways, Carter seems more relevant than George W. Bush, his ideas more contemporary, his interests more outward-looking. He builds houses in New Orleans and elsewhere with his Habitat for Humanity project; he jets around the world, funding projects to deal with global health crises; he makes sure elections are free and fair. Carter is more like Bono than he is like Bush.

Hendrik Hertzberg praises the piece, while Marty Perez is critical.

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