by Chris Bodenner
Apparently the "right-wing" blogger I criticized in my earlier post was being ironic:

Satire's getting harder and harder to pull off--and we're just beginners. Though we strongly disagree with Mr. [Bodenner] about affirmative action, Mr. Public was satirizing the sort of far right blogger who finds a justification for his wrong opinions even in very rationally expressed views that coincide only slightly with his own, such as Mr. [Bodenner]'s. Everything Mr. [Bodenner] says in his post is correct as a response to this sort of thinking. Maybe satire is really dead because there is no wrong opinion, no matter how extreme or looney, that doesn't appear somewhere on the internet.  I'm not sure it's possible to be sufficiently over the top anymore for people to recognize satire.

He makes a great point; his exaggerated post still falls short of the extreme rhetoric I regularly find in the blogosphere.  So regardless of its true intent, the spoof was a good foil.   

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