In the aggregate, the equality in same-sex relationships can help couples navigate issues more openly, communicate with less anger, harbor less gender-based resentment:

One well-known study used mathematical modeling to decipher the interactions between committed gay couples. The results, published in two 2003 articles in The Journal of Homosexuality, showed that when same-sex couples argued, they tended to fight more fairly than heterosexual couples, making fewer verbal attacks and more of an effort to defuse the confrontation. Controlling and hostile emotional tactics, like belligerence and domineering, were less common among gay couples.

Same-sex couples were also less likely to develop an elevated heartbeat and adrenaline surges during arguments. And straight couples were more likely to stay physically agitated after a conflict.

I don't think this is because gay couples are inherently more moral or nicer. It's just further proof that heterosexual relationships are very hard. You have so much more to understand about each other before you even start.

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