It's not just revulsion at Bush, as a reader explains:

I think Novak is right when he notes that Obama's appeal among some conservatives has much to do with a reaction against the direction of the Republican Party.  By exclusively relating it to this, however, he misses a key aspect of Barack's appeal for some conservatives, which is that Obama's story confirms what conservatives have always believed about America.

He is the black son of an immigrant, raised by a modest single mother and yet despite the obstacles inherent in this background he is approaching the pinnacle of American success.  Isn't he the poster boy for what conservatives have always assured us is possible here in America?  Conservative perseverance, not liberal victimization explains Obama's rise.  He is a black Horatio Alger whose life adds to the long list of American success stories that began with Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography.  He personifies the American exceptionalism which is at the heart of American conservatism.  If he wins conservatives, even those that vote against him, can justifiable take pride in their nation and say, "Only in America."   

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