Habeas corpus lives:

"Petitioners have met their burden of establishing that the DTA review process is, on its face, an inadequate substitute for habeas."

And this very wide-ranging ruling:

"The laws and Constitution are designed to survive, and remain in force, in extraordinary times."

And this defense of Constitutional government:

"To hold that the political branches may switch the Constitution on and off at will would lead to a regime in which they, not this Court, say "what the law is... Security subsists, too, in fidelity to freedom's first principles. Chief among these are freedom from arbitrary and unlawful restraint and the personal liberty that is secured by adherence to the separation of powers ... Within the Constitution's separation-of-powers structure, few exercises of judicial power are as legitimate or as necessary as the responsibility to hear challenges to the authority of the Executive to imprison a person."

The Bush-Cheney attempt at dictatorial power for the presidency in the war on terror has not held. The system finally worked.

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