Weddingdavidmcnewgetty

A reader writes:

My spouse and I were married today after 15 1/2 years together.  The process was very smooth and easy.  We had a 3:30 appointment; when we arrived at San Bernardino city hall registrar, there was a church advertising that it would marry anyone.  There were no protesters. There were a lot of female couples, and one of the clerks even cried when she spoke to one of the females getting married.  We filled out the paperwork without complaint, but we hit a patch when we found out that we had to get a witness.  The clerk said we could ask around.  The one young man who would be the last person we would ask jumped up and wanted to do it.  He said he wanted to be part of history.

When we were in the ceremony room, my spouse started laughing during the vows. He said it was a mixture of wanting to cry and not believing marriage was possible.

(Photo: Tori (L) and Kate Kendall, who already share the same last name, hold their five-month-old baby Zadie while being are joined in wedlock as the era of same-sex marriage begins in California, June 17, 2008 in West Hollywood, California. By David McNew/Getty.)

 

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