Inside_a_wildtype_banana

The dude conceded the point eventually, apparently. A reader adds:

The banana in question is a Cavendish Banana, which actually are asexual offshoots of larger, bulkier banana plants. These supermarket mutants bear little resemblance to their progenitor, the wild banana, which is a green oval-shaped thing full of large seeds and liquid (see above). The domestication of the wild banana began between 5000 and 8000 years ago, and only after thousands of years of farming and breeding (one can call that evolution if one wishes) did they even begin to slightly resemble their celebrated yellow hue, curved shape and 'natural' wrapper.

Christian apologetics has certainly deteriorated over the centuries. From Saint Thomas Aquinas and Rene Descartes with their long treatises to washed up child stars with poorly constructed 'common sense' appeals in only 800 years. The fruit, I suppose, has fallen far from the tree.

The comic strip Jesus and Mo deals with the issue here.

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