Larry Hunter expresses some of the mixed feelings a lot of us have:

The sad fact remains that, where foreign policy and limiting individual rights are concerned, any Republican candidate with a chance to win the presidency today is captive to right-wing radicals, and where domestic policy is concerned, any Democratic candidate is captive to left-wing radicals. Therefore, it's a choice between a Republican candidate who would lead America on an immoral suicide mission around the world and a Democratic candidate who would maim all Americans in a misbegotten and deluded quest to bring "justice" to some Americans at the expense of others. 

Lamentable as that choice may be, it's not a difficult one. So take heart--it may be that a little economic suffering today is the political price we must pay to pave the way for a new force of moderation in American politics tomorrow, perhaps a force that--for a change--will be capable of getting both foreign and domestic policy right at the same time.

Do higher taxes and a nod to redistributionism count more than habeas corpus, withdrawal from Iraq and some fiscal responsibility? McCain complicates things, but one paramount and genuinely conservative motive in this election is a simple one: to punish the Republican party for its betrayal of conservatism and contempt for the Constitution.


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