American novelists are taking their sweet time in producing new books:

In recent years a highly visible group of "Great American Novels" have emerged from 10, 12, and even over 20-year gestation periods. Edward P Jones, Junot Diaz and Jeffrey Eugenides all took 11 years to write their Pulitzer prize-winning novels -a blink, really, when compared to Shirley Hazzard and Marilynne Robinson's 23-year gaps preceding The Great Fire and Gilead respectively. In a country that invented the internet, let alone the interstate, where computers are replaced every two years and iPhones tossed out after mere months, this is beyond pokey. It's positively counter-cultural.

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