All the toxins, less addictive:

"I'm convinced that there's very little we can do on the toxicant side," Zeller said. "But imagine a world, however many decades from now, in which the cigarette remains as deadly and toxic as it is today, but it's not addictive because there's no nicotine in it."

From a public health perspective, Zeller thinks that the lack of the main addictive agent in cigarettes would do more for reducing the overall population susceptibility to the dangers of smoking than any amount of biotech tinkering could do in reducing the carcinogens in tobacco.

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