I just prised the results of a recent reader survey out of the live hands of the Atlantic's business staff. Thanks to those who filled out the pop-up form. Here's some data about who you are, based on a survey sample of a couple of thousand. You're 73 percent male; a third of you are under 40; the Dish's biggest age bracket is 41 - 45. It's a very well-educated crowd: 22 percent of you have a graduate degree; 17 percent have a professional degree; and 8 percent have PhDs. Taken together, well over half of you have some sort of post-grad education.

27 percent of you are single or never married; 50 percent of you are married; 13 percent of you are partenered or in a civil union; 7 percent are divorced. 72 percent of you have no children in your home. You're also affluent. Only 22 percent of you earn $50K or less. Another fifth earn between $50K and $75K. Well over half have household income of over $100K a year.

The ideological mix: 2.5 percent of you describe yourselves as very conservative;

9.6 percent as conservative; 33.3 percent as moderate; 38.1 percent as liberal; and 16.5 percent as very liberal. I'm, not sure whether this is a function of my Obama love, or what. There was no category for libertarian, alas, which might mean something. Geographically, our biggest state is the biggest state by population: California, with 15.3 percent of the readership. Next up: New York, with 10 percent. But it's striking how dispersed you all are after that. There are Dish readers in every state, except South Dakota. You're 89 percent in America; with 3 percent in Britain and Canada each. 27 percent do not live in a major metropolitan area.

You like multi-tasking: 86 percent reported that they liked the morass of info coming at them in the new media age. Almost half of you check blogs several times a day. 69 percent of you have commented on websites. 56 percent have contributed to a political campaign.

No big surprise: one of the most educated, informed and affluent readerships on the web. And seven years ago? A handful of friends read this blog. You gotta love new media.

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