Do they represent the future of milder, more liberal right wing? Tim Montgomerie argues:

David Cameron and John McCain have much in common.  That much was clear when, in October 2006, the Republican crossed the Atlantic to give a keynote address to the Tory annual conference.  They are also both free-traders and David Cameron recently went out of his way to identify John McCain as an ally against protectionism. They are also allies on climate change, civil liberties and a conservatism that is more compassionate.  Tensions will centre around the British Tories' rejection of liberal interventionism and an unwillingness to commit to a substantial rebuilding of Britain's overstretched armed forces.  It would also be wrong to overstate the similarities between UK and US domestic policy priorities.  On welfare reform, tax policy and action against crime American public policy is ten years ahead of Britain.  Issues that are less electorally salient in America remain potent in Britain where taxes and crime have not been retired as issues.

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