"Many conservatives believe that the key question in this election is: Are there to be two multiculturalist open-borders parties or one? ... Any bill similar to the senator’s “comprehensive” immigration reform would accelerate the GOP’s relative demographic decline by creating new voters overwhelmingly likely to vote Democrat in a quicker time scale. This dominant Democratic majority would emerge fully only after a hypothetical President McCain left office, but its approach would cloud the future of every other Republican incumbent," - John O'Sullivan.

Is John saying that conservatism is an inherently racial or cultural phenomenon that future Hispanic-Americans will be unable to support? I don't see why that should be the case. The United States, meanwhile, is a multi-cultural nation, in case John hasn't noticed. That's part of its strength. And neither party favors "open borders" by any stretch of the imagination. There is a pessimism bordering on despair among conservatives right now that is as vexing as it is self-defeating. It does not bode well for a potential McCain presidency.

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