A reader writes:

I know you feel quite strongly that if McCain were to become President that the US would stop the heinous practice of torturing detainees. I disagree, and submit two arguments to bolster my assertion:

1. McCain gets a lot of credit for the anti-torture bill. But when Bush eviscerated it with a signing statement McCain uttered nary a peep of dissent. Cynics, like me, argue that like many of McCain's so- called "maverick" positions, his stand on torture is something he's willing to pay lip-service to prop up the idea that he's his own man. But underneath that he doesn't care to push the issue for fear of alienating the torture-loving base. I think his willingness to backtrack on a number of positions (see Falwell and Roberston for another example), shows that there simply is no mettle to the man.

2. He hasn't uttered a word about the recent admission that the government has waterboarded, won't investigate whether or not it's a crime, and will do it again. Face the facts Andrew, he might say he cares, and in his own cowardly heart he might really care, but he has neither the will nor the inclination to stand up and be heard when it's most important. As long as he scores points he's quite happy to lose the battle.

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