James Flynn is one of the most respected scientists in the field, the man who showed that we're all getting smarter, i.e. the "Flynn Effect." Here's a piece that focuses on the race and IQ questions, and the interaction between genes and environment. Money quote:

There is still the puzzle of how environmental differences can be so weak when we compare individuals born at the same time, but so strong over time. The key, which Flynn attributes to fruitful discussions with his collaborator, William Dickens, an economist at the Brookings Institution in Flynn's hometown of Washington, DC, lies in the observation that superior genes cause superior performance by co-opting superior environments...

Flynn's thesis ... points towards a satisfying answer to his original question: why do black Americans still perform worse on IQ tests than whites do, even when matched for poverty and other disadvantages? It is perfectly possible that in a still-biased society their genes can only co-opt inferior environments.

ZenPundit comments here. Ten questions for Flynn here.

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