Kenyayasuyoshichibaafpgetty

Maybe the State Department was on vacation:

The American State Department, having first congratulated Mr Kibaki on his victory, hastily withdrew this accolade and said: "We do have serious concerns, as I know others do, about irregularities in the vote count."

My italics. Meanwhile the country explodes. Kenya's bloggers are busy countering the government's media blackout. Kenyan Pundit, Ory, writes:

This is now officially a police state.

Menacingly, the Kibaki government's patent election-rigging has split the military, opening up the prospect of civil war:

Planning an alternative inauguration can be interpreted as treason which would explain the security forces heavy approach (if this is true). During the press conference Raila introduced an army Major who stated that the armed forces are behind Raila. Our military is divided.

But the US sent congrats to the the men who stole a democratic election. However unqualified some of the candidates in this election, could any of them be more incompetent in foreign affairs than the Bush administration?

(Photo: Kenyans wave 'pangas' (a broader blade machete) as they demonstrate after fresh violence linked to the disputed presidential poll erupted 30 December 2007 at the Kibera slum in Nairobi, during the Presidential polls winner, Mwai Kibaki's swearing in ceremony. By Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty.)

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