The latest evidence of brazen destruction of critical evidence of illegal activity by the CIA seems to have provoked even the most die-hard of Bush supporters into something like reality. To Malkin, I am part of the "unhinged left". But even she has to concede:

It is bad.

Rick Moran expresses what many on the center-right privately feel:

There may be good reason to destroy DVD’s of interrogations. But not when they have probative value in a potential court case nor when they are destroyed to cover up wrong doing by employees of the government.

Moran wants to junk the Geneva Conventions - but even he sees that, whatever your view of them, they are still the law of the land, and destruction of evidence that they have been broken is a function of a government that regards itself as above the law. And Moran also understands that the law is crystal-clear:

And yes, waterboarding is torture. Putting a prisoner in stress positions is torture. Sleep deprivation is torture.

James Joyner notes:

The CIA’s entirely plausible explanation is that they destroyed the tapes for security reasons rather than to subvert the legal process. That doesn’t, of course, mean that they didn’t subvert the legal process in so doing; indeed, it’s rather obvious that they did.

Insta-silence, of course. Glibertarians don't care about the government torturing people and destroying the evidence. And despite page one treatment across the planet, crickets chirp at the Corner.

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