Pretty staggering:

Hoover’s plan called for “the permanent detention” of the roughly 12,000 suspects at military bases as well as in federal prisons. The F.B.I., he said, had found that the arrests it proposed in New York and California would cause the prisons there to overflow.

So the bureau had arranged for “detention in military facilities of the individuals apprehended” in those states, he wrote.

The prisoners eventually would have had a right to a hearing under the Hoover plan. The hearing board would have been a panel made up of one judge and two citizens. But the hearings “will not be bound by the rules of evidence,” his letter noted.

It probably made Michelle Malkin's Christmas. Powerline:

Hoover was too quick to judge people disloyal--it would be interesting to get a look at the list of 12,000-- but some may feel nostalgic for a time when disloyalty was at least acknowledged to be a bad thing.

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