That's what the government intelligence agencies are reporting:

The assessment, a National Intelligence Estimate that represents the consensus view of all 16 American spy agencies, states that Tehran’s ultimate intentions about gaining a nuclear weapon remain unclear, but that Iran’s “decisions are guided by a cost-benefit approach rather than a rush to a weapon irrespective of the political, economic and military costs.”

“Some combination of threats of intensified international scrutiny and pressures, along with opportunities for Iran to achieve its security, prestige, and goals for regional influence in other ways might if perceived by Iran’s leaders as credible prompt Tehran to extend the current halt to its nuclear weapons program,” the estimate states.

Cheney allegedly tried to stop the report coming out sooner.

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