I miss me my Jon Stewart. And the blogging on the strike has gotten weirder. God knows where this free association came from:

"... talks between the WGA and AMPTP have been suspended while the producers try to find some negotiators who aren't taking large quantities of LSD and other club drugs. They might have to move the negotiation site because the producer's team has already worn out the supply of teen aged hookers from both sexes on Sunset. They're thinking maybe San Francisco would be a better site. The producers are foolish to think this. The hookers in San Francisco were unionized by Margo St. James back in the 70's. They. Hate. Them. Some. Scabs."

Ooookaaaay. Moving right along, someone is ghost-writing the industry's spokesmen:

While were not going to point fingers or assign blame, we do feel justified in saying that [the writers] are entirely at fault. The AMPTP has successfully concluded 306 major agreements with unions since its founding in 1982, and there has never been an incident like this. Except for that writers strike in 1985. And the directors strike in 1987. And that other writers strike in 1988. Aside from three isolated incidents, however, this strike is completely without precedent.

Hat tip: Badtux.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.