Pretty awful:

Fewer than one-in-five Pakistanis (15%) have a positive view of the U.S. -- of the publics included in the 2007 survey, only Palestinians (13%) and Turks (9%) are less favorably disposed. Moreover, despite their own concerns about terrorism, Pakistanis overwhelmingly oppose U.S.-led efforts to fight terrorism -- six-in-ten (59%) oppose America's anti-terror campaign, while only 13% back it. Pakistanis are also leery of American efforts to encourage democracy in their country -- 57% believe the U.S. only promotes democracy when it serves its interests, and 72% say they dislike American ideas about democracy.

However, like other Muslim publics included in the 2007 Pew survey, Pakistanis overwhelmingly endorse key democratic values and institutions.

This was true before Bush, and there's even been a bit of an uptick in pro-Americanism lately - so you can't blame all this on the current administration. The other good news is that however badly we've been playing the p.r. game, al Qaeda has been doing worse. The obvious inference is that any intervention in Pakistan should be as discreet and modest as possible.

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