"I had instructed the prosecutors in September 2005 that we would not offer any evidence derived by waterboarding, one of the aggressive interrogation techniques the administration has sanctioned. Haynes and I have different perspectives and support different agendas, and the decision to give him command over the chief prosecutor’s office, in my view, cast a shadow over the integrity of military commissions. I resigned a few hours after I was informed of Haynes’ place in my chain of command," - Morris D. Davis, the former chief prosecutor for the Office of Military Commissions. Scott Horton comments here.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.