David Samuels offers this:

It is difficult to imagine that America’s newly limber devotion to a future Palestinian state is going to convince Arab listeners of anything other than the fact that America is feeling afraid and alone. Yet by loudly insisting that the creation of a Palestinian state is a central goal of American policy, Bush and Rice have laid down a marker that the next American president will be forced to pay off. Assurances that Israel’s security will somehow be assured before the final ribbon-cutting ceremony in Ramallah do little to disguise the fact that America has established itself – and not Israel – as the final arbiter of whether Israeli security worries are valid.

I wish I could be in the slightest bit optimistic. Wonkette offers a Condi photo-op guide. Melanie Phillips lapses into total self-parody:

Annapolis is America’s Munich and Israel is the new Czechoslovakia.

She's not the only one, alas:

I've long observed that the trademarks of this Administration's approach to foreign policy has been: to neglect a problem when they might have taken action to help solve it; to let ideology trump reality when they finally do get involved; and to "spin" when they fail.

And the beat goes on.

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