A reader writes:

You wrote:

"It's an absolutely trivial story - but its triviality is what's telling."

No, it's not telling. Anybody with an ounce of imagination could come up with multiple scenarios for what happened that fit the known facts, at least half of which would demonstrate that Clinton's staff had the intention to tip and made an effort to do so that somehow went wrong.

When a story like this gets this convoluted, when there's unlikely ever to be a way to document which scenario is the correct one, it's totally absurd either to insist on pursuing it further or to claim any given scenario is the right one.

Esterday herself said it best: "You people are really nuts. There's kids dying in the war, the price of oil right now there's better things in this world to be thinking about than who served Hillary Clinton at Maid-Rite and who got a tip and who didn't get a tip."

Andrew, you really are totally irrational on the subject of the Clintons.

I'd just like to know, in this small instance, why the Clinton campaign felt the need to lie immediately. That's all.

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