Burke urges us:

Whilst men are linked together, they easily and speedily communicate the alarm of any evil design. They are enabled to fathom it with common counsel, and to oppose it with united strength. Whereas, when they lie dispersed, without concert, order, or discipline, communication is uncertain, counsel difficult, and resistance impracticable. Where men are not acquainted with each other's principles, nor experienced in each other's talents, nor at all practised in their mutual habitudes and dispositions by joint efforts in business; no personal confidence, no friendship, no common interest, subsisting among them; it is evidently impossible that they can act a public part with uniformity, perseverance, or efficacy...When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.

In this election, among the central questions, it seems to me, should be: who will restore the rule of law in America? Who will restore constitutional balance? Who will restore habeas corpus? Who will end torture? And who is the wisest in tackling the extremely difficult task of isolating moderate Muslims from Jihadist terrorists across the globe, using measured force to defeat terrorism where necessary, but winning arguments where essential? Who will best secure our departure from Iraq? And who can actually unite decent, patriotic Americans around these goals again?

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