"For the Bush Doctrine to survive Bush, it will have to incorporate all we have learned since he formulated it. Much of it comes down to this: the Middle East is not Europe, Iraq is not Germany, and Afghanistan is not Japan. (They are not Vietnam either.) The road to hell is paved with bad analogies, which are no substitute for lived experience and specific knowledge. According to the Greek poet Archilochus, “the fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” The hedgehogs have taken the Bush Doctrine as far as they can. Now it is the turn of the foxes," - Martin Kramer, Commentary.

My only quibble is that seeing the fight against Islamism as a subtle, multi-pronged effort that requires more than brute force - i.e. restraint, unseemly alliances at times, diplomacy, etc. - is essentially the end of the Bush doctrine. And can you imagine Rudy Giuliani being able or willing to adopt any such strategy? And yet Kramer is advising him.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.