"Pregnancy removes the female from reproductive sex for long periods of time. The primary source of sexual pleasure, the clitoris, is also biologically removed from the act of procreation. A man can successfully impregnate a woman without ever stimulating her clitoris or giving her sexual pleasure. A man can Tcs2 successfully impregnate a woman by raping her. The very existence of the clitoris is therefore a living rebuke to those who argue that nature itself - the way our bodies have been constructed - dictates a certain and necessarily procreative sexual morality.

What is the proper use of the clitoris? It plays no essential role in actual procreation, and yet is the prime source of female sexual pleasure. If this isn't an indication that nature allows for sex purely as pleasure or as a pleasurable way to intensify and deepen an emotional bond, then what is? Or to take a second example. All women eventually stop menstruating. On average, they live longer lives than men, and so whole swathes of their lives entail, as a function of biology, that their sex lives will be consciously and unavoidably non-reproductive. If natural law is premised on a commonsensical inference from nature, then how on earth can it be construed not merely to argue that procreation is the sine qua non of sex, but that everything else is anathema?" - Chapter Two, The Conservative Soul, now out in paperback.

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