Obsessed with each other, it seems. And jealous:

[A]lthough they met only a few times and did not hit it off, the two men were obsessed with each other. It was an obsession that shaped their best known works such as Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest and James's The Turn of the Screw.

"The more I did the research, the more I became sure about it," she says, sitting in her seventh-floor office overlooking Edinburgh's George Square. "There are clear parallels. Wilde goes out of his way to review James's novels, to keep tabs on him and to say he's not the future of American literature. James feels the same anxiety towards Wilde: he's keen to keep tabs on him, but doesn't respect what he's doing."

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