It's a really confused country, isn't it? Among the confusions:

Why have Roman Catholics historically been more reluctant to view gambling as a sin than Protestants but then again, why have even Protestants opted to raise money through bingo? Are people who gamble responsible for the consequences of their own behavior, or is gambling evidence of an addiction? Why are poker tournaments and lotteries considered gambling, but investing in the stock market or real estate is not? Are we really witnessing something new here, or have Americans always been gamblers? Is gambling more harmful to women than men, and therefore a feminist issue? Is gambling rational? Is it glamorous? What does the popularity of gambling say about American attitudes toward thrift, and if American views of thrift are changing, what implications follow for the study of American values? Are younger people more or less attracted to gambling than their elders?

The Brits have no such conflicts. They'll bet on anything.

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