He writes:

Can someone tell me what controversial procedures have been used at Guantanamo Bay?

We actually have a log of what was done to Qhatani. Steven Miles's book is one of the most powerful and detailed. From my review in Time last year:

In one of the few actual logs we have of a high-level interrogation, that of Mohammed al-Qhatani (first reported in TIME), doctors were present during the long process of constant sleep deprivation over 55 days, and they induced hypothermia and the use of threatening dogs, among other techniques. According to Miles, Medics had to administer three bags of medical saline to Qhatani while he was strapped to a chair and aggressively treat him for hypothermia in the hospital. They then returned him to his interrogators. Elsewhere in Guantanamo, one prisoner had a gunshot wound that was left to fester during three days of interrogation before treatment, and two others were denied antibiotics for wounds.

Sleep deprivation over 55 days, induced hypothermia, dietary manipulation, medical manipulation, and long-time standing were methods employed by Stalin. I assume Cliff is not denying that torture occurred in Stalin's Soviet Union. Or do we have to call some of Stalin's techniques "enhanced interrogation" now?

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